Tag Archive | "Southampton"

Watershed Weekend with The Parrish Art Museum & The Nature Conservancy

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WalkingTourAccabonac

Accabonac Harbor. Image courtesy of The Nature Conservancy. 

The Parrish Art Museum has partnered with The Nature Conservancy in two events meant to highlight one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the East End of Long Island: water quality.

On Saturday, September 27 at 11 a.m., the museum will host “Watershed: Artists, Writers, Scientists and Advocates on Our Waters” in the Lichtenstein Theatre. The PechaKucha style talk will feature eight speakers including LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) accredited architect Glynis Berry who serves on the Suffolk County Planning Commission and is with the U.S. Green Building Council; Dr. Chris Gobler, a professor at SUNY Stony Brook’s School of Atmospheric and Marine Sciences and an expert on the topic of harmful algal blooms; Nature Conservancy Long Island Executive Director Nancy Kelley, Hampton Bays bayman Ken Mades; Southampton resident and Executive Director of the Lloyd Magothy Water Trust, Thomas McAbee; Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst; Edwina von Gal, East Hampton-based landscape architect and President of the Azuero Earth Project whose mission is to preserve the earth’s ecosystems, protect biodiversity, and promote healthy communities; and artist and teacher at the School of Constructed Environments at Parsons the New School for Design in New York City, Allan Wexler, whose work in the fields of architecture, design, and fine art explores human activity and the built environment.

The museum will follow the discussion with a Sunday, September 28 Walking Tour of Accabonac Harbor, one of the regions most diverse tidal marsh systems. Both programs are being presented in conjunction with The Parrish Art Museum’s ongoing exhibition, “Platform: Maya Lin.”

For more information, visit parrishart.org. 

Noyac Civic Council Celebrates 60 Years With Gala to Benefit Ambulance Corps

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The Noyac Civic Council will celebrate 60 years of community services with a gala celebration on Saturday, September 27 from 6 to 10 a.m. at Harlow, 1 Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. The event, which is $90 per person with tickets available at The Whalebone General Stone, will feature cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, as well as a sit down dinner with all proceeds benefiting the Sag Harbor and Southampton Volunteer Ambulance Corps. The civic council is offering a group discount rate of $80 per person for purchases of six or more tickets at one time. For more information, email cnmn@optonline.net.

Clavin Earns Spot on NY Times Best Sellers List

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Author, journalist, professor and Sag Harbor resident Tom Clavin has earned a spot on The New York Times best sellers list for his book, “The Heart of Everything That Is,” co-written by Bob Drury. The biography of Red Cloud, the influential Sioux leader, the book examines his life and military prowess as well as the Plains Indians’ changing way of life in the 1850s and ’60s. The book appeared in the number 10 position on The New York Times Print Paperback Best Sellers, non-fiction, on September 21. It was the book’s first week on the list.

Sag Harbor’s Red Tide Takes Battle of the Bands

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redtide

The Sag Harbor-based band Red Tide won the first place prize at the Southampton Youth Bureau’s 12th Annual Battle of the Bands earlier this month. Second place was awarded to The Entertainment from Center Moriches, with third place going to Vintage Penguin of Westhampton Beach.

Red Tide features Harlan Beeton on bass and vocals, Anthony Genovesi on drums and Sam Grossman on guitar. To hear their music, visit reverbnation.com/redtideofficial.

Deadline for Florence Writers Conference Looms

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View on Florence Duomo and city from Campanile tower.

Always wanted to live the life of a writer in Florence, sipping wine at the Café Giubbe Rosse or walking in the footsteps of Dante Alighieri? The Stony Brook Southampton MFA Program in Creative Writing offers just that kind of experience, January 13 through January 24, during its Florence Writers Workshop featuring a fiction workshop with Sag Harbor resident Susan Scarf Merrell, author of “Shirley: A Novel” and fiction editor of “TSR: The Southampton Review.”

The program also includes an evening at the opera, a walking tour of Florence, a faculty-guided trip to the Bargello museum and an excursion to the Italian countryside, as well as an elective in contemporary Italian fiction, Michelangelo and the Medici family, Italian style and design or Italian cooking.

The deadline to apply for the workshop is October 2. For more information, visit stonybrook.edu/mfa/winter.

The Southampton Review has also announced The Robert Reeves $1,000 Prize in Comic Fiction, judged by distinguished author and editor Daniel Menaker. The entry fee is $15 per submission (no more than 5,000 words), and entries are due by October 31, Winners will be notified on January 15 and honored at the Manhattan launch of TSR: The Southampton Review’s Spring 2015 issue. Finalists will be considered for publication in TSR Online. For more information, visit thesouthamptonreview.com.

 

Voter Registration Drive

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The League of Women Voters of the Hamptons will register voters at 12 sites across the East End on Tuesday, September 23, which is the third annual National Voter Registration Day.

Now in its third year, National Voter Registration Day was established in 2012 on the fourth Tuesday in September and boasts more than 1,000 partnering organizations across the United States. Its purpose is to bring attention to the importance of registering to vote on time.

The New York State deadline is October 10 for the general election on November 4.

“Anyone who was not registered previously, or who has moved, or changed his or her name needs to fill out a voter registration form,” said the Hamptons League’s voter services co-chair Anne Marshall. “We hope you will stop by one of our tables, where we will also be glad to answer any of your questions.”

League volunteers will be at Schiavoni’s Market in Sag Harbor from 10 a.m. to noon; at the Bridgehampton Post Office from 10 a.m. to noon; at Cromer’s Market on Noyac Road from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; at Waldbaums Supermarket on Jagger Lane in Southampton from 4 to 6 p.m.; at the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton, also from 4 to 6 p.m.; at Chancellors Hall at the Stony Brook Southampton campus from 5 to 7 p.m.; at the East Hampton Post Office from 10 a.m. to noon; at One Stop Market in East Hampton on Springs-Fireplace Road from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Montauk Post Office from 10 a.m. to noon; at King Kullen in Hampton Bays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; at Stop & Shop in Hampton Bays, also from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and at Simon’s Beach Bakery in Westhampton Beach from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Those with questions can contact the league at (631) 324-4637 or visit lwvhamptons.org or call the Suffolk County Board of Elections at (631) 852-4500.

Accident on Scuttlehole Road in Bridgehampton Causes Traffic Delays

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Southampton Town police officers and Bridgehampton Fire Department EMTs attend to the wounded driver of a semi tractor-trailer carrying a load of dirt that overturned at the intersection of Scuttlehole Road and Brick Kiln Road on Friday morning

Southampton Town police officers and Bridgehampton Fire Department EMTs attend to the wounded driver of a semi tractor-trailer carrying a load of dirt that overturned at the intersection of Scuttlehole Road and Brick Kiln Road on Friday morning

By Michael Heller

Southampton Town police officers and Bridgehampton Fire Department EMTs attend to the wounded driver of a semi tractor-trailer carrying a load of dirt that overturned at the intersection of Scuttlehole Road and Brick Kiln Road on Friday morning. The driver was subsequently transported to the hospital via helicopter for further treatment.

Governor Cuomo Deafeats Teachout in Democratic Primary

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By Mara Certic

Although New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo decisively won the democratic gubernatorial primary on Tuesday, September 9, his opponent, Zephyr Teachout, led many of the polls on the East End.

Governor Cuomo won the primary with 62.1 percent of the vote, Ms. Teachout, a law professor in New York, received 34.2 percent.

According to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections, in East Hampton Town,  Ms. Teachout received 307 votes, while only 207 East Hamptonites voted for Governor Cuomo. Last week, Betty Mazur, the vice chairwoman of the East Hampton Democratic Committee, sent out an e-mail blast endorsing Ms. Teachout and criticizing Governor Cuomo for his unfulfilled promises and particularly for his lack of response to local problems with PSEG Long Island.

According to the board of elections, Governor Cuomo took Suffolk County with just under 55 percent of the vote, while Ms. Teachout received almost 43 percent. According to the BOE, 16,030 out of 296,315 eligible voters, or 5.4 percent, turned out to vote.

In the Town of Southampton, Governor Cuomo beat out his opponent by just five votes, receiving 450 to Ms. Teachout’s 445. Ms. Teachout also proved popular on Shelter Island, where she received nine more votes than the incumbent governor.

Ms. Teachout, a constitutional and property law professor at Fordham University, announced she was running “to lay out a bold vision and provide a real choice for voters,” according to her website. Her running mate, Tim Wu, is a law professor at Columbia University.

“We are not Albany insiders, but we believe Governor Cuomo and Kathy Hochul can be beat, and must be challenged. We will force Governor Cuomo to defend his record of deep education cuts, his tax cuts for banks and billionaires, his refusal to ban fracking and his failure to lead on the Dream Act,” their website reads.

The 2014 New York gubernatorial election, pitting Governor Cuomo against Republican Rob Astorino, will take place on Tuesday, November 4. For questions about voter registration or polling places in Suffolk County visit suffolkvotes.com or call (631) 852-4500.

Latin American Film Festival Returns to the Parrish

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Sergio Hernández (Rodolfo) and Paulina García (Gloria) in Sebastián Lelio’s “Gloria,” which will be screened at 3 p.m. on Sunday, September 14.

By Mara Certic

Seven boxes, a fisherman and a middle-aged Chilean woman will be featured in films screened next weekend during the 11th annual OLA Film Festival at the Parrish Art Museum.

The Organización Latino-Americana of Eastern Long Island (OLA) is a local outreach nonprofit that promotes the Latino community’s cultural, economic, social and educational development in the towns of East Hampton and Southampton. Isabel Sepulveda, one of the founders of OLA, started the film festival back in 2003 and for the past six years, the Parrish Art Museum has hosted the Spanish-language weekend.

“Isabel Sepulveda has been with it from the beginning. She has the vision each year,” said Andrea Grover, curator of special projects at the Parrish, who added that Ms. Sepulveda is “essential” to the festival. Ms. Grover said she always enjoys the OLA film festival and “it is something that people anticipate and are enthusiastic about seeing.”

“In 2001, we founded OLA. Part of the mission was to do advocacy work. We thought we could reach more people doing cultural events,” Ms. Sepulveda said on Monday. “Through an annual film festival we can bring the two communities together.”

It is a fun change of theme for the Parrish, which usually screens films on the subject of art. “This is a little bit of a different tact for us. It’s something that we find really valuable,” Ms. Grover said in a phone interview on Saturday.

There is no theme to the festival, no connection to art, as such, except that each of these films are critically acclaimed and highly anticipated. According to Ms. Grover, Ms. Sepulveda “is trying to reach as broad as an audience as possible” with her choices for the festival. Documentaries, dramas and comedies have all made it to the big screen at the OLA film festival, even shorts, but Ms. Grover said the curator “is looking for quality.”

The OLA film festival features recently released, critically acclaimed movies from different Latin American countries, according to Ms. Grover. The festival kicks off on Friday, September 12, at 5:30 p.m. with “Pescador” (“Fisherman”).

“Pescador” was co-written and directed by Ecuadoran filmmaker Sebastián Cordero in 2011. It tells the story of 30-year-old Blanquito (played by Andrés Crespo), who lives with his mother in a small fishing village where he never really felt he belonged. One day, Blanquito discovers a box filled with bricks of cocaine and he finds a way to get out of his 30-year rut. He is determined to sell the cocaine back to the cartel for top prices and to use that money to leave the small village and change his life.

He falls for a woman named Lorna, with whom he spends the rest of the 96-minute film on a dangerous adventure. “Pescador” won awards for best director and best actor at the 2012 Guadalajara Mexican Film Festival, and Mr. Crespo won another award for best actor at the Cartagena Film Festival in Colombia.

Following the screening of “Pescador,” Afro-Cuban and Puerto Rican band Mambo Loco will perform on the Mildred C. Brinn Terrace at the Parrish at 7 p.m. “It’s something we plan to develop further,” Ms. Grover said of expanding the festival’s offerings.

The next day at 3 p.m., the Parrish will show a Paraguayan film, “7 Cajas” (“7 Boxes”).  The PG-13 film directed by Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schémbori is the story of the lure and dangers of money.  Victor, a 17-year-old wheelbarrow operator, accepts $100 to transport seven boxes of unknown content through an eight-block journey in the busy municipal market. Drama and danger ensue in the action-thriller, which won five awards at various film festivals, including the Audience Award at the Miami Film Festival.

The last film to be screened over the weekend will be on Sunday at 3 p.m. The film is “Gloria,” the story of a rebirth for a middle-aged divorcée living in Santiago. “It’s one I’ve wanted to see because it depicts a woman in her mid-life and it’s a depiction of a real life scenario done with kindness,” Ms. Grover said. “It’s subject matter not frequently featured,” she said, adding that Ms. Sepulveda has been eager to feature the Chilean movie since its release.

The R-rated tale won a total of 17 awards at festivals all around the world, including the main competition at the Berlin International Film Festival and several best actress awards for Paulina Garcia, who plays the title role.

Ms. Sepulveda said there are many high-quality films coming out of Latin America. “I wish we could have a longer festival, like two weeks. It takes a lot to put it together, especially when everyone’s volunteering their time. It’s not easy,” she said.

Tickets for each film are $10; admission is free for museum members, students and children. The musical performance by Mambo Loco is free with museum admission. The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org

 

 

 

For the Love of Roses

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web roses

By Emily J. Weitz

“She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” 

~Antoine de St. Exupery, The Little Prince

As the little prince knew too well, to love a rose takes effort, patience, and thought. Even when they have a wild look about them, with their thorns and brambles all tangled across a gate, roses require a great deal of care.

Rick Bogusch, who manages the grounds at Bridge Gardens, has nurtured the rose garden since he started there six years ago. Every winter, he tucks them in to beds of mulch 12 to 18 inches deep, and every spring, he prunes them delicately and watches them come back to life.

The Southampton Rose Society will present a lecture by Mr. Bogusch at Bridge Gardens on Saturday, September 13, from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Many of the most striking specimens in the garden, Mr. Bogusch said, will still be in bloom.

The rose garden was installed by the property’s previous owners, Jim and Harry Kilpatrick, and Mr. Bogusch spent his first year at Bridge Gardens learning about the unique demands of these flowers. They were selected for the hardiness and their ability to endure the long winters, but still they need to be attended to. Last winter, which was particularly cold and long, Mr. Bogusch brought one of the rose plants inside and nursed it through the roughest patches, and now it has sprung back.

“Roses are very demanding,” said Mr. Bogusch. “They demand a lot of attention and resources and consistency of care. Time, energy, man hours, money: You really have to be willing to put that into them.”

Along with mulching and pruning, roses need to receive about 2 inches of water every week. Mr. Bogusch also fertilizes them regularly throughout the season to keep them vigorous.

Perhaps it is the effort that they require that makes roses so precious. Throughout history, they have been used in ceremonies and by royalty to mark special occasions. They are prized for their aesthetic value and their pungent fragrance. Mr. Bogusch says the rose garden, even though it is just one of several impressive gardens at Bridge Gardens, is a major draw for people.

“It’s a big attraction,” said Mr. Bogusch, “because everybody loves roses. When people find out there’s a rose garden here, they want to see it.”

The garden itself is round, with brick pathways throughout that separate the beds. The beds are organized by color, so that the rose garden resembles a giant color wheel. One bed spills with red roses. A path separates it from a pink bed, a yellow bed, and so on. There are eight beds in all.

Walking through the rose garden, one is taken not only by the aesthetic beauty, but the pungency of the air.

“Some of the roses in our garden are very fragrant,” said Mr. Bogusch. For example, there’s a white hybrid rose that blooms in the classic form called Pope John Paul II.

“That’s one of the most fragrant roses of all time,” he said.

Mr. Bogusch just planted Pope John Paul II this past spring, and already it is growing vigorously. Another plant, which is original to the garden, is called About Face.

“It’s large and strong and old,” said Mr. Bogusch. “And it’s so beautiful that you do an about-face when you walk by it.”

“You start to see blooms in late May, and June is the first peak,” said Mr. Bogusch. “Then there’s another peak in September.”

This year the roses have bloomed continually, which Mr. Bogusch attributes a temperate summer when the thermometer didn’t climb into the 90s.

“Our garden,” he explained, “has brick, and can get very hot and humid, which roses don’t like.”

Because of the relatively cool summer, this year’s stroll through the rose garden should be particularly rewarding.

To register for the lecture and tour, go to the Rose Society web site at southamptonrose.org or call (631) 740-4732. Bridge Gardens is located at 36 Mitchell Lane in Bridgehampton.