Tag Archive | "Southampton"

Citizens for Access Rights to Host Annual Fundraiser Thursday

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Citizens for Access Rights or CfAR will hold their annual fundraiser on Thursday, June 5 at 7 p.m. at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett.

The event will feature live music, auction items and a raffle. The cost is $20 for CfAR members renewing at the door, $10 for current 2014 members and $25 for non-members. All proceeds go to CfAR to protect beach access on the East End.  CfAR t-shirts will also be for sale.

CfAR is a group of East End residents who support open access to local beaches. In response to two lawsuits in which private individuals are claiming to own the ocean beach at Napeague, CfAR has supported the East Hampton Town Trustees, the town board and any other governmental body, which is willing to oppose the privatization of the beaches.

For more information on CfAR, visit citizensforaccessrights.com, or “like” CfAR on Facebook.

Shinnecock Bay Restoration Seminar

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SoMAS faculty and students among oyster gardener volunteers for SBU’s Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program.

Faculty members of the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University will present a seminar, “The Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program,” on Friday, June 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Duke Lecture Hall of Chancellor’s Hall at Stony Brook Southampton.

During more than a decade of research in Shinnecock Bay, scientists have documented the strong negative trajectory in the bay’s water quality, bivalve populations, and seagrass habitat.

With the initiation of the Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program, these same scientists have identified approaches to reverse these trends and improve the ecological condition of the bay.

The goal of the Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program is to use science, outreach, and partnerships to restore the water quality and fisheries of Shinnecock Bay via enhancing natural filtration capacity of the ecosystem with bivalve shellfish, expanding remaining eelgrass beds, and enhancing nutrient removal through macroalgae. The program is specifically focused on using the species or strains of bivalve and eelgrass be best suited as restoration targets in different regions of Shinnecock Bay.

The program involves robust monitoring of the whole ecosystem to assess the efficacy of restoration. This presentation will provide an overview of the program, highlight progress and successes to date, identify challenges, and describe the near term plans of the program.

ARF of the Hamptons Announces New Series of Dog Training Classes

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ARF dog trainer Matthew Posnick. 

The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons has announced the launch of three new series of dog training classes.

Puppy Kindergarten resumes on Friday, June 6, from 4 to 5 p.m. Classes will focus on socialization, interactive skills and simple obedience.

The course will run for four straight Fridays and the fee is $100. A reduced fee of $75 is available to those who adopted their puppy from ARF within the past month.

Dog Obedience 101 and Intermediate Classes will start on Saturday and Sunday, June 14 and 15.

Dogs and their handlers will learn basic obedience using positive reinforcement techniques. The curriculum includes Leash Handling, Let’s Go, Turning Techniques, Stay/Stand, Sit/Stay, Down/Stay, Leave It, Come, No Jumping and Leash Pulling Prevention exercises.

Participants can choose an introductory course on Saturday or Sunday mornings from 9 to 10 a.m. for five straight weeks. The intermediate class is held on Saturday and Sunday mornings, from 10 to 11 a.m., also for five straight weeks.

The fee is $150 for all five classes; or $125 for those who have adopted their dog from ARF within the last year.

Recreational Dog Agility classes return on Saturday, June 14. Participants will be the bond of trust between themselves and their pet as they get great exercise working their ways through a variety of obstacles. A class for beginners will be held on Saturdays from 4 to 5 p.m. for five straight weeks. An intermediate class will be announced at later date.

The fee is $175 for all five classes.

All the classes are taught by Matthew Posnick and held at ARF’s Adoption Center at 90 Daniels Hole Road in Wainscott.

Advocates Discuss Lack of East End Youth Services

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By Stephen J. Kotz

East End youth advocates gathered on Thursday, May 29, at the David Crohan Community Center in Flanders to solicit ideas about how Suffolk County could both maintain and improve the services to young people.

The impetus for the forum was the completion of a draft report by an East End subcommittee of the Suffolk County Youth Board Coordinating Council that focused specifically on the East End. The subcommittee was one of four convened by the county, the others being tasked with studying behavioral health issues, teen pregnancy and unemployment.

“There is a lot of agreement that this is an under served community,” said Nancy Lynott, the director of the Southampton Town Youth Bureau in an interview on Monday. She added that while it was reassuring that the county recognized the East End’s special needs, the region must still fight for its fair share of funding.

That will be particularly true in years to come, she said, because of a change in how funding for youth services is doled out at the county level by New York State. “There have been changes that give the county some flexibility in how state funding is used,” she said. “It used to be designated for each municipality, but starting in 2014, it all goes to county” to allocate as it sees fit.

The report, which is due to be completed next month, will be an important tool if East End providers of youth services want to maintain their share of the county pie. “We want to be able to show why East End communities should be getting priority,” she said. “They are aware of our situation, but they wanted not just stories and anecdotes, but hard information.”

What the report found was that it is difficult to get everything from mental health services to employment counseling on the East End because it is so far east of the county’s population centers, there is a lack of public transportation, and services are available on a spotty basis.

“Service delivery is fragmented,” Ms. Lynott added, “with some provided by towns, villages and even the county. We also have 30-some school districts on the East End. So what we have to do is get everybody on the same page.”

Last week’s event was co-sponsored by youth bureaus in Southampton, Riverhead and Southold towns as well as by Suffolk County Legislators Jay Schneiderman, who represents the South Fork, and Al Krupski, who represents the North Fork.

Although the image of the East End is one of wealth and glamor, Ms. Lynott said there is a darkly different reality behind the façade. “We have some terrific wealth out here, but we also have some terrific poverty,” she said.

During her presentation, she said that East End communities routinely turn up in lists of the most underprivileged in the county. Six of the most economically distressed communities in the county found on the East End, with 76 percent of teens between the ages of 16 to 19 unemployed. Seven of the 15 communities with the highest number of uninsured families are also here. East End children also qualify at higher averages for free or reduced-fee school lunches, and young people on the East End “are well above the national average in their use and abuse of alcohol and drugs.”

East End youth are priced out of the housing market and have limited social outlets, the report found. And those who finish school find “they don’t know what they are going to do next and we have we have very little to offer them,” Ms. Lynott said.

“Government doesn’t understand that if you spend $2,000 on prevention, you might save $30,000 to $40,000 down the road” in treatment or jail costs, said Riverhead Councilman Jon Dunleavy, one of several public officials to attend Thursday’s roundtable.

Rachel Toy, a Sag Harbor resident and a recent college graduate, said providing good jobs for local youth is a must.

Southampton Town Councilman Brad Bender suggested that local building contractors could be enlisted to launch an apprentice program to help in that effort.

Kerry Laube, a Westhampton Beach Police Department sergeant, said teaching kids about the dangers of substance abuse should be a priority.

Helen Atkinson-Barnes, who runs educational programs at The Retreat, a non-profit that provides shelter and counseling for domestic abuse victims in East Hampton, called on educating young people about the importance of developing healthy relationships. “Underlying a lot of those issues” contained in the report “are unhealthy relationships,” she said.

“First, I want to address transportation,” said Laura Smith of the North Fork Alliance, who said better bus service is needed to help young people get to jobs and appointments.

Improving mental health services was the concern of Andrea Nydegger, who works with the Eastern Suffolk BOCEs on the North Fork. “I have kids who get referred to me constantly,” she said, adding that she tells parents counseling is cheaper than paying for a tutor.

Kim Jones of the East Hampton Anti-Bias Task Force agreed there was a “dire need” for better mental health services, and said that the community had recently learned of the second suicide this year of a young person.

“Our high school students are not asking ‘where are you going to college?’” she said. ‘They are asking, ‘who do you think is gong to commit suicide next?’”

“We realize this is just the beginning,” Ms. Lynott told the gathering. “I hope we can continue these discussions. Maybe we can get some real changes started.”

“Art of Dance” Brings Artwork to Life on Stage in Southampton

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The company at Studio 3 practice. Photo courtesy Studio 3.

The company at Studio 3 practice. Photo courtesy Studio 3.

By Tessa Raebeck

In its annual spring production, Southampton dance center Studio 3 will bring famous works of art to life on stage in “The Art of Dance.”

For two nights, Saturday, June 7, and Sunday, June 8, the local dance school will bring works from artists as varied as Degas, Matisse and Banksy alive in the form of ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop, contemporary and lyrical dance.

Ballet dancers rehearse at Studio 3 in Southampton. Photo courtesy Studio 3.

Ballet dancers rehearse at Studio 3 in Southampton. Photo courtesy Studio 3.

Diane and Meredith Shumway, the owner and assistant director of Studio 3, respectively, together with up-and-coming students-turned-choreographers Thomas Gallo, Liam Gifkins, and Jenna Mazanowski, have drawn inspiration from art to choreograph, costume and develop a variety of pieces.

“The best part of developing each piece was the learning process for the teachers, as well as the students,” said dance teacher and Studio 3 assistant director Meredith Shumway. “We are going above and beyond this year because students aren’t just dancing to music on a stage, they are expressing the mood, feeling, color, pattern and history of each work of art and bringing it to life.”

“The Art of Dance” is Saturday, June 7, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, June 8, at 2 p.m. at the theater at the Southampton High School, 141 Narrow Lane in Southampton. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (631) 537-3008, email tickets@dancestudio3.com or visit dancestudio3.com.

Landscape Pleasures Offers an Insider’s Look at Southampton’s Ever-Changing Gardens

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The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is one of the homes featured on the Parrish Art Museum's Landscape Pleasures garden tour this Sunday, June 8. Photo by Doug Young.

The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is one of the homes featured on the Parrish Art Museum’s Landscape Pleasures garden tour this Sunday, June 8. Photo by Doug Young.

By Tessa Raebeck

Like a piece of artwork or a writer’s manuscript, a garden is never truly finished. As with all art, gardens can always evolve, changing with the seasons and naturally growing out of plans and designs, developing over time in a never-ending evolution.

Gardening is the art of the Earth, providing the willing and creative with another means of finding beauty in the mundane.

“All I know is, I don’t paint with a trowel or garden with a brush,” the late Robert Dash said in a video by P. Allen Smith Classics filmed in 2011, two years before his death, when asked about the connection between gardening and painting.

“They inform one another in ways that are very mysterious. It’s how the trowel is wielded or how the brush is wielded that informs the canvas or the Earth and there are no rules. And the only way you know how to do something in either of those arts is by doing it,” he added.

Mr. Dash, an artist, writer and gardener who died in September at age 82, “believed very much in gardens taking their time and developing over a period of time,” said Jack deLashmet, co-chair of Landscape Pleasures, which will honor Mr. Dash this year.

Hosted by the Parrish Art Museum, Landscape Pleasures includes three lectures by gardening and landscape design experts on Saturday, June 7, followed by a day of tours of some of Southampton’s most historic and remarkable gardens on Sunday, June 8.

The 2-acre Sagaponack garden of Mr. Dash, the Madoo Conservancy, which is open to the public, is included among the private estates on Sunday’s tour.

Established in 1967, the internationally known organic garden is a testament to Mr. Dash’s belief in the ever-evolving landscape. The grounds offer a tour across history, featuring Tudor, High Renaissance, early Greek, English, French and Asian influences.

Mr. Dash’s horticultural wisdom—and his commitment to the garden as a canvas that is ever changing and organic—will be celebrated and expanded on this weekend.

“We’ve always had excellent speakers,” said Mr. deLashmet of the annual garden tours, who believes this year’s Landscape Pleasures is the best yet. “The theme is the never finished garden, that gardens really evolve—and everybody will have a slight take on that,”

On Saturday, southern landscape design architect Paul Faulkner “Chip” Callaway, “an absolutely entertaining speaker,” according to Mr. deLashmet, will present, reflecting on his experience creating nearly 1,000 gardens, concentrating on period restoration work and designing historically relevant gardens.

Following Mr. Callaway, Martin Filler, the architecture critic for The New York Review of Books, and renowned for his more than 1,000 articles, essays and books on modern architecture,  will celebrate the contributions of Rachel “Bunny” Mellon, the Listerine fortune heiress who was a patron of the arts with a dedicated interest in gardening, landscape design and the history of gardens.

A friend and confidante of Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Ms. Mellon redesigned the White House Rose Garden. She died in March at the age of 103.

One of the world’s premiere garden designers, Arne Maynard, is the final speaker Saturday. Known for his large country gardens in Great Britain, the United States and across Europe, Mr. Maynard has the special “ability to identify and draw out the essence of a place, something that gives his gardens a particular quality of harmony,” according to the Parrish website.

Continuing the celebration of the changing nature of gardens, the self-guided tour Sunday features properties with rich histories behind them.

The garden of Perri Peltz and Eric Ruttenberg, an 1892 property originally called “Claverack,” is rarely open to the public.

Although it has evolved, the owners are always mindful of their home’s deep history; the original outhouses, bucolic buildings housing poultry, dairy and the stables, were, in a move that is sadly rare on the East End, married together and allowed to remain.

Designer Tory Burch will open up her home, a 1929 red brick Georgian House and 10-acre garden known as Westerly that is one of Southampton’s grandest estates.

“A great story about both restoring and finding old plants,” according to Mr. deLashmet,  Bernard and Joan Carl, the owners an 8-acre estate called “Little Orchard,” restored original plantings while also bringing in new gardens.

“We did not want to be beholden to the past just for the past’s sake,” Ms. Carl told the Parrish.

The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is an American style garden flanked by a new Palladian villa. The landscape offers a modern interpretation on standard ideas of gardening, with fruits and vegetables, an herb garden, and a vase decorated with poetry made by Mr. Dash.

As the late Mr. Dash once said, “Gardening is very much like setting a table—and if you can set a good dinner table, you can be a good gardener.”

A two-day event, Landscape Pleasures begins Saturday, June 7, at 8:30 a.m. at the Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For a full calendar and more information, call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org.

Nursing Award for Patricia Wright

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Patricia Darcey, RN, chief nursing officer and vice president of Patient Care Services at Southampton Hospital and chairwoman of the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council Nurse Executives Committee; Patricia Wright, RN, Southampton Hospital, Nurse of Excellence Award winner; Betty Commander, RN, nurse manager of Southampton Hospital’s Kathleen D. Allen Maternity Center; and Valerie Terzano RN, member of the NSHC Nurse of Excellence sub-committee and senior vice president of nursing and chief nursing officer, Winthrop-University Hospital.

By Stephen J. Kotz

Patricia Wright, RN, a nurse in Southampton Hospital’s Kathleen D. Allen Maternity Center, has been honored with the 2014 Nurse of Excellence Award by the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council. Ms. Wright received the award on May 21 at a ceremony hosted by the council at the Woodbury Country Club.

Each year, leading nurses from Long Island’s hospitals and nursing education programs honor their peers with the awards, with one nurse from each of its member hospitals nominated for outstanding leadership and clinical practice.

Historical Society Relives Days of the Railroad in Sag Harbor

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A train pulls up to Sag Harbor’s freight depot. Photo courtesy Sag Harbor Historical Society.

 

By Stephen J. Kotz

Save for the Garden Depot on Spring Street, which was long ago moved from its original location, there is nary a sign in the village that Sag Harbor was once the eastern terminus of the Long Island Rail Road on the South Fork, with regular passenger and freight service and serving as an important link to steamboat service to the North Fork and Montauk.

But, in fact, the railroad arrived in Sag Harbor in 1870—a full 25 years before it pushed on to East Hampton—and it played a major role in revitalizing a village whose economy had been left in tatters by the end of the whaling era.

The Sag Harbor Historical Society’s new summer exhibit, “The LIRR in Sag Harbor 1870-1939,” aims to give modern day residents and visitors a glimpse, through photographs, old timers’ memories, newspaper reports, and the occasional artifact, of what it was like when steam locomotives pulling passenger cars chugged into a beautiful brick depot donated by—who else?—Mrs. Russell Sage.

The show, on display at the society’s Annie Cooper Boyd House on Main Street, will officially open this weekend, after the historical society holds its annual meeting at the museum this Saturday, May 31, at 3 p.m. At the members-only event, Bryan Boyhan, the publisher emeritus and consultant of The Sag Harbor Express, will introduce the exhibit with a reading of an account of the railroad’s arrival that was first published in The Express 144 years ago.

“It was a drunken blast, as far as I can tell,” said Jean Held, a member of the society’s exhibit committee, who was largely responsible for curating this year’s display,  “although they did not describe it in such plain English.” Instead, she said, merrymakers, official and otherwise, were described as so happy about the railroad’s arrival “that they were unable to stand on their own two feet.”

In designing the exhibit, Ms. Held focused on several themes, including why railroad service, which had been extended to Greenport in 1844, was so badly needed. For one, in winter, the bay was often frozen solid—for 90 straight days in 1868, for instance—leaving Sag Harbor cut off from the rest of the world. Mail delivery was also intermittent, and the travelers on the Bridgehampton Turnpike were even from time to time set upon by armed robbers.

Eventually, Southampton Town and Sag Harbor Village agreed to ante up the money to buy the right-of-way needed to bring the train north from Bridgehampton.

Progress was watched with anticipation, with The Express reporting on November 11, 1869, “Now that work has commenced on the road in our midst, we can realize more forcibly that we are to have a railroad. Looking out of the rear windows of our office we can see some 50 men busily at work shoveling on the meadow, throwing up an entrenchment equal to the fortifications in front of a besieged city.”
Although the arrival of the railroad on June 11, 1870, was greeted with great fanfare, cracks in the relationship between Sag Harbor and the LIRR soon appeared when the line’s president, Oliver Charlick, insisted that all freight to and from the village run on the railroad, and if not, that the railroad be paid a fee anyway. When the village balked, Mr. Charlick reneged on a promise to build a beautiful depot. Instead a small shed was built at the end of the line until Mrs. Russell Sage had one built in 1909.

Ms. Held said in designing the exhibit that she wanted to include entries on some locals who refused to allow the LIRR to push them around. One was Betsy Josey, who refused to sell her boarding house near what would become the depot until she got her price. Rumor has it that when a party representing the railroad approached her place she appeared in an upstairs window, threatening to douse them with scalding water. She eventually got her price, $1,350, and her home was moved to Cross Street, off Division Street.

Although not everyone enjoyed cordial ties with the LIRR, its arrival did help revive Sag Harbor’s struggling economy. The presence of the railroad, for instance, helped convince Joseph Fahys to move his watchcase factory from New Jersey to Sag Harbor in 1881. Within a year after opening, it employed 350 workers. Other businesses, including William Eatons Printers and Engravers, which opened a small factory on Jermain Avenue, followed.

Hotels also cropped up, joining The American Hotel, which was already a fixture here, to serve a growing clientele of tourists.

To reach Sag Harbor, the railroad veered north at Lumber Lane in Bridgehampton, crossing the Bridgehampton Turnpike between Hampton Court and the Huntington Crossway. Today, a portion of the rail bed is a trail in the Long Pond Greenbelt. The line emerged from the woods near the parking area on the west side of the park, and hugged the shoreline of Sag Harbor Cove before making its entrance into the village down the future Long Island Avenue.

In its heyday, there was a siding to Round Pond, a popular source of ice in the winter, and another to a brickyard off Clay Pit Road. But when the line was extended to East Hampton and all the way to Montauk, ridership began to fall off, as passengers no longer had a need to transfer to a steamboat in Sag Harbor to complete their journey.

In 1927, the railroad replaced regular service with single-car trolley type trains, known variously as “Doodlebugs” or the “Sag Harbor Scoot.” They remained in service until 1939 when the LIRR successfully petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission to abandon the branch.

In the intervening years, the tracks were torn up, although the occasional spike is still found along the greenbelt trail. Wetlands that were filled in along the tracks in Mashashimuet Park are now ballfields. There is no trace of a small station that once stood on the west side of the Bridgehampton Turnpike just south of Brick Kiln Road. Even the depot built with Mrs. Sage’s largesse and described as one of the loveliest on all of Long Island, could not ward off the march of time. Converted into the home of Dipple Fuel, it too succumbed to the wrecking ball in 1965 to be replaced by what is now the Capital One Bank drive-through next to the post office.

“The LIRR in Sag Harbor 1870-1939” will open at the Sag Harbor Historical Society’s Annie Cooper Boyd House on Main Street, Sag Harbor, there will be a preview open to the public, with an introduction from Bryan Boyhan of the Sag Harbor Express, on Saturday, May 31 at 3 p.m.

 

After Tragedy, Woman Petitions for Dog Park

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Tina Pignatelli and her dog Huckleberry.

 

By Stephen J. Kotz

A Bay Point woman whose pet dog was struck and killed by a Sag Harbor Village truck at Havens Beach a few weeks ago has started an online petition drive to have a portion of the park fenced off as a dog park.

“He was a wonderful, wonderful dog,” said Tina Pignatelli of her 6-year-old golden doodle, Huckleberry. “I felt like I could talk to him and he understood exactly what I was saying.”

Ms. Pignatelli said she has already collected about 160 signatures on her iPetition and has an ultimate goal of 500. She hopes to pitch her idea to the Sag Harbor Village Board at its next meeting, on June 10.

“I’m not trying to go against the village,” she said. “I’m just trying to make this a really beautiful place for people and make it safer for dogs.”

The field on the eastern side of the park is an informal gathering place for dog owners and their pets.

Mayor Brian Gilbride said on Wednesday that even though he was sympathetic to Ms. Pignatelli, he would not be inclined to support her idea. “At the end of the day that is not a dog park, nor is it supposed to be,” he said. “It is really supposed to be a picnic park.”

The mayor added that the village has spent a lot of money trying to clean up Havens Beach and pointed out that a person hired by the village to take water samples there recently remarked that there was a significant amount of dog feces on the beach.

Ms. Pignatelli said she thought most dog owners were conscientious about cleaning up after their pets, adding that she thought a formal, fenced-in dog park might result in them becoming even more diligent.

As part of her proposal, Ms. Pignatelli said she had reached out to landscape architects, Jack Delashmet Associates, and they had agreed to design a landscaped area on the south side of the field, leaving ample space for landing Medevac helicopters and a wide enough gate to accommodate cars if the field is needed for parking for events like the fire department’s annual carnival.

“I’m willing to raise the money,” she said. “I’m not asking for village’s money. I just want their permission.

Ms. Pignatelli said on the fateful day, Huckleberry was in a playful mood when she brought him to the beach to exercise him off his leash. When she tried to get him back in the car, he dashed out in front of a village work truck that was leaving the parking area.

She was able to get the injured dog back in her vehicle, but he died as she drove him to Old Towne Animal Hospital in Southampton. “There was nothing that anyone could have done,” she said. “He came to me during a hard time in my life. I miss him every day.”

Kevin Pollak Kicks off Bay Street’s Comedy Showcase Series

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Comedian Kevin Pollak performs at Bay Street Theatre on Monday, June 2 at 8 p.m. Photo courtesy Bay Street Theatre.

 

By Mara Certic

The Comedy Showcase returns for its fourth year this Monday, June 2, at Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor. This year’s summer-long series kicks off with a performance by stand-up comedian and actor Kevin Pollak.

“We’re really excited that we were finally able to get him this year,” said Gary Hygom, Bay Street’s managing production director. “The kind of the cool thing about him is that he’s one of the few comedians who have had a huge dramatic career. Few people know that he started out as a comic.”

Known for dramatic roles in “A Few Good Men,” “Casino” and “The Usual Suspects,” Mr. Pollak started performing stand-up comedy in 1967 when he was just 10 years old. In his late teens, he started performing professionally and, after taping his first solo HBO comedy performance, Mr. Pollak was cast in “Willow,” a 1988 film directed by Ron Howard.

Mr. Pollak is known for his solid celebrity impressions, particularly his Christopher Walken, Peter Falk and William Shatner shticks.

Five years ago Mr. Pollak began “Kevin Pollak’s Chat Show,” an online talk show aired once a week. Guests such as Matthew Perry and Dana Carvey have been invited on air to play games like “The Larry King Game” –during which guests complete a series of tasks all while doing a bad Larry King impression—and “Who Tweeted”—in which guests guess the celebrity authors of embarrassing tweets.

Steve Rannazzisi will take to the Bay Street stage a few weeks later, on Monday, June 30. Mr. Rannazzisi is known for his role as Kevin on the FX show, “The League.” Mr. Rannazzisi got his break on MTV’s “Punk’d”: Ashton Kutcher’s practical joke reality television show. He has since become known for work on the comedy stage, on television and on the silver screen.

“I’m really looking forward to seeing Steve perform,” said Mr. Hygom of Mr. Rannazzisi. “I’ve never seen him live, but I’ve heard he’s just unbelievable.”

A newcomer to the showcase will be writer and comedian Heather McDonald who will continue the series the following week with a July 7 performance. Ms. McDonald has been celebrated for her writing for the late-night comedy talk show, “Chelsea Lately,” and her collaboration with the Wayans brothers on two of their feature films.

Ms. McDonald has been featured on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and has guest-starred on several prime time shows. Her 2010 book, “You’ll Never Blue Ball in This Town Again,” spent seven weeks on The New York Times best-seller list.

After his sold-out show at Bay Street last year, Bobby Collins returns to its stage on July 14. Mr. Collins performs upward of 200 stand-up bits every year and is well known for his work on VH1′s “Stand Up Spotlight.” Mr. Collins has been the warm-up act for artists such as Frank Sinatra, Dolly Parton and Cher.

Mr. Collins’s career in observational stand-up comedy began over 20 years ago, when he gave up a well-paying job at Calvin Klein to pursue his dream to make people laugh.

“I don’t like to have comedians come back and do the same material,” Mr. Hygom said. “But Bobby has such a huge repertoire, his shows always change. Everything is always new and fresh”

Maine-native Bob Marley—not to be confused with the Wailer—will perform the first of August’s comedy showcases on August 11. Mr. Marley is one of few who have performed on the entire late night talk show circuit. He has had roles in cult film favorites, such as the “Boondock Saints.”

Last in the series, Grammy- and Tony-award nominee Robert Klein returns to Bay Street on August 18 for what is expected to be another sold-out performance. Mr. Klein has received recognition for his comedy and also for his musical work on Broadway.

With over 100 appearances on “The Tonight Show and Late Show with David Letterman” to his credit, Mr. Klein got his start in comedy when he auditioned for the improvisational troupe, Second City.

Mr. Klein has released several successful comedy albums, one of which is said to have influenced comedy great Bill Crystal—who on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” admitted to have, in his youth, decorated his apartment wall with a poster of Mr. Klein.

Bay Street Theatre will present up-and-coming comedy stars when the All-Star Comedy Showcase also returns this summer. Hosted by Joseph Vecsey, the June 9 show will also feature comics recognizable from appearances on Comedy Central, MTV and PBS.

The Comedy Showcase performances are at 8 p.m. on most Mondays throughout the summer season. Bay Street Theatre is located at 1 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, or to purchase tickets visit baystreet.org or call (631) 725-9500.