Tag Archive | "Water Mill"

Landscape Pleasures Offers an Insider’s Look at Southampton’s Ever-Changing Gardens

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The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is one of the homes featured on the Parrish Art Museum's Landscape Pleasures garden tour this Sunday, June 8. Photo by Doug Young.

The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is one of the homes featured on the Parrish Art Museum’s Landscape Pleasures garden tour this Sunday, June 8. Photo by Doug Young.

By Tessa Raebeck

Like a piece of artwork or a writer’s manuscript, a garden is never truly finished. As with all art, gardens can always evolve, changing with the seasons and naturally growing out of plans and designs, developing over time in a never-ending evolution.

Gardening is the art of the Earth, providing the willing and creative with another means of finding beauty in the mundane.

“All I know is, I don’t paint with a trowel or garden with a brush,” the late Robert Dash said in a video by P. Allen Smith Classics filmed in 2011, two years before his death, when asked about the connection between gardening and painting.

“They inform one another in ways that are very mysterious. It’s how the trowel is wielded or how the brush is wielded that informs the canvas or the Earth and there are no rules. And the only way you know how to do something in either of those arts is by doing it,” he added.

Mr. Dash, an artist, writer and gardener who died in September at age 82, “believed very much in gardens taking their time and developing over a period of time,” said Jack deLashmet, co-chair of Landscape Pleasures, which will honor Mr. Dash this year.

Hosted by the Parrish Art Museum, Landscape Pleasures includes three lectures by gardening and landscape design experts on Saturday, June 7, followed by a day of tours of some of Southampton’s most historic and remarkable gardens on Sunday, June 8.

The 2-acre Sagaponack garden of Mr. Dash, the Madoo Conservancy, which is open to the public, is included among the private estates on Sunday’s tour.

Established in 1967, the internationally known organic garden is a testament to Mr. Dash’s belief in the ever-evolving landscape. The grounds offer a tour across history, featuring Tudor, High Renaissance, early Greek, English, French and Asian influences.

Mr. Dash’s horticultural wisdom—and his commitment to the garden as a canvas that is ever changing and organic—will be celebrated and expanded on this weekend.

“We’ve always had excellent speakers,” said Mr. deLashmet of the annual garden tours, who believes this year’s Landscape Pleasures is the best yet. “The theme is the never finished garden, that gardens really evolve—and everybody will have a slight take on that,”

On Saturday, southern landscape design architect Paul Faulkner “Chip” Callaway, “an absolutely entertaining speaker,” according to Mr. deLashmet, will present, reflecting on his experience creating nearly 1,000 gardens, concentrating on period restoration work and designing historically relevant gardens.

Following Mr. Callaway, Martin Filler, the architecture critic for The New York Review of Books, and renowned for his more than 1,000 articles, essays and books on modern architecture,  will celebrate the contributions of Rachel “Bunny” Mellon, the Listerine fortune heiress who was a patron of the arts with a dedicated interest in gardening, landscape design and the history of gardens.

A friend and confidante of Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Ms. Mellon redesigned the White House Rose Garden. She died in March at the age of 103.

One of the world’s premiere garden designers, Arne Maynard, is the final speaker Saturday. Known for his large country gardens in Great Britain, the United States and across Europe, Mr. Maynard has the special “ability to identify and draw out the essence of a place, something that gives his gardens a particular quality of harmony,” according to the Parrish website.

Continuing the celebration of the changing nature of gardens, the self-guided tour Sunday features properties with rich histories behind them.

The garden of Perri Peltz and Eric Ruttenberg, an 1892 property originally called “Claverack,” is rarely open to the public.

Although it has evolved, the owners are always mindful of their home’s deep history; the original outhouses, bucolic buildings housing poultry, dairy and the stables, were, in a move that is sadly rare on the East End, married together and allowed to remain.

Designer Tory Burch will open up her home, a 1929 red brick Georgian House and 10-acre garden known as Westerly that is one of Southampton’s grandest estates.

“A great story about both restoring and finding old plants,” according to Mr. deLashmet,  Bernard and Joan Carl, the owners an 8-acre estate called “Little Orchard,” restored original plantings while also bringing in new gardens.

“We did not want to be beholden to the past just for the past’s sake,” Ms. Carl told the Parrish.

The garden of Margaret and R. Peter Sullivan is an American style garden flanked by a new Palladian villa. The landscape offers a modern interpretation on standard ideas of gardening, with fruits and vegetables, an herb garden, and a vase decorated with poetry made by Mr. Dash.

As the late Mr. Dash once said, “Gardening is very much like setting a table—and if you can set a good dinner table, you can be a good gardener.”

A two-day event, Landscape Pleasures begins Saturday, June 7, at 8:30 a.m. at the Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For a full calendar and more information, call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org.

Reggae and Steel Drum Music at the Parrish Art Museum

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The Next Level Band will perform at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill Friday, June 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

The Next Level Band will perform at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill Friday, June 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

By Tessa Raebeck

As part of its ongoing Sounds of Summer series of live music on the outdoor terrace, the Parrish Art Museum presents the five-piece reggae and steel drum group The Next Level Band Friday, June 6, from 6 to 8 p.m.

The band is an eclectic group of American, Caribbean and European musicians, playing authentic reggae favorites and their own calypso-infused arrangements of classic songs. Tyrone Parris of Barbados is on the guitar and steel drums while his wife, La Dawn Parris, who has performed with Anita Baker and the Temptations, among others, sings.

“Our summer music program brings together performers of diverse musical persuasions and encourages all ages to dance, dine, socialize or just enjoy the fresh air,” said event organizers Andrea Grover, curator of special projects at the museum, and Amy Kirwin, visitor services and museum programs manager.

Guests are invited to bring lawn chairs and blankets to the show, which costs $10 or is free with museum admission. The Sounds of Summer series continues with Mambo Loco on July 4 and Edith and Bennett on August 1. For more information, visit parrishart.org.

Sounds of Summer Series Kicks off at the Parrish Art Museum with the HooDoo Loungers

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The HooDoo Loungers. Photo courtesy Joe Lauro.

The HooDoo Loungers will perform at the Parrish Art Museum Friday, May 23. Photo courtesy Joe Lauro.

By Stephen J. Kotz

The Parrish Art Museum’s second annual Sounds of Summer series will get off to a decidedly, if unseasonably, Mardi Gras theme when the HooDoo Loungers take to the stage on the museum’s covered terrace on Friday, May 23.

“It’s all New Orleans-inspired stuff. It’s all in that vein,” said bassist Joe Lauro, the co-founder of the nine-piece ensemble and a self-described aficionado of American roots music. “We started off doing covers, but now we do about half originals. It’s a stompin’ band.”

The concert, which takes place at 6 p.m., is the first in a series of five that have been scheduled over the next three months. Also appearing in the series will be the Next Level Band, which performs steel drum and reggae, on June 6; Mambo Loco, which performs Latin-inspired jazz, on July 4; Edith and Bennett, who perform old-time folk music, on August 1; and the Ebony Hillbillies, a bluegrass band whose performance will include a barbecue for attendees, on September 5.

The concerts are free with museum admission, which is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and free for children under 18 or students with an identification card.

“On Friday nights we are open late and we have this beautiful, west facing terrace …that can be used for live music, films, that sort of thing,” said Andrea Grover, the Parrish’s curator for special projects. “This program is really geared toward reveling. It’s the kind of music that is intended to get people up and dancing. Or, if you like, you can go out on the lawn with your kids and let them run around and jump up and down.”

Mr. Lauro is well known among Sag Harborites for the occasional music film series he hosts at Bay Street Theatre, using footage owned by his company, Historic Films, as well with his past, and still occasional, performances with the Lone Sharks, Gene Casey’s rhythm and blues-based band.

Besides Mr. Lauro, the Loungers’ lineup includes a pair of vocalists, Dawnette Darden and Marvin Joshua (who recently joined the band), David Dietch, on keyboards and accordion, Michael Schiano on guitar, Dave Giacone on drums and a three-member horn section made of Brian Sears on tenor and baritone sax, Ed Leone on trombone and Gary Henderson on trumpet that, Mr. Lauro said, handle the majority of the solos.

“Every band out there—all they have is guitars,” he said. “We said, ‘Let’s do something different!’”

Mr. Lauro said that Mr. Dietch handles the group’s arrangements and tries to keep fresh the classics the group plays as well as provide an authentic New Orleans feel to its original songs. “We write to the theme,” he said.

A documentary filmmaker who branched into the world of film archiving, amassing an incredible collection of vintage music footage, from Billie Holiday and Charlie Parker, through Elvis Presley, the Beatles and later rock groups, Mr. Lauro said he was bitten by the music bug at an early age.

“The Beatles,” he responded when asked his inspiration for taking up the bass. “But I had two lives as a kid. I also had this secret life of loving vaudeville singers like Al Jolson and Eddie Kantor. So I was listening to that and completely loving the Beatles and all the stuff that was coming up.”

Thanks to groups like the Beatles that covered ’50s R&B and rockabilly, Mr. Lauro said he learned about the likes of Carl Perkins, Fats Domino and Little Richard by working his way backward. “Eventually you learned that Paul McCartney could scream, but not like Little Richard.”

After moving east more than 30 years ago, Mr. Lauro hooked up with an old high school bandmate, Mr. Schiano, in the Moondogs. Later, he joined Mr. Casey’s Lone Sharks for several years.

He and Mr. Dietch formed the HooDoo Loungers about four years ago. “When I left the Lone Sharks, I wanted to do a New Orleans project. But I thought we’d be more of a show band, and do a whole retrospective show for corporate parties and that sort of thing. Pretty soon we started doing original stuff, but we still do lots and lots of old New Orleans stuff.”

Mr. Lauro said he hoped that some of the infectious joy that imbues the spirit of life in New Orleans comes through in the band’s playing.

“Partying isn’t something they do on Saturday night. They live that the whole year,” he said. “They celebrate joy through music. That kind of works for me.”

For more information about Sounds of Summer and other Parrish events, call 631-283-21118 or visit parrishart.org.

 

Jazz en Plein Air Series at the Parrish

The Parrish Art Museum will also once again hold its Jazz en Plein Air series, on the first Friday of each month from May through August.

The series starts on Friday, May 30, at 6 p.m. with an appearance by jazz drummer Eliot Zigmund, who has played behind the likes of Chet Baker and Bill Evans. The series continues with Nilson Matta on June 27, Iris Ornig on July 25, and an act to be announced for August 29.

Seating is limited and reserved for guests ordering food and beverages from the museum café. However, guests are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the music from the terrace and lawn.

Here Comes the Sun at East End Arts

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"Luncheon Al Fresco," 24 x 36 oil painting by Leo Revi of East Hampton. Photo courtesy East End Arts.

“Luncheon Al Fresco,” 24 x 36 oil painting by Leo Revi of East Hampton.

By Tessa Raebeck

This weekend at the Remsenburg Academy, East End Arts will celebrate the long-awaited arrival of summer with an invitational art show featuring five artists from the East End.

Leo Revi of East Hampton, a self-described painter of light, captures the effects of sunlight in his paintings, drawing inspiration from impressionist painters such as Claude Monet and Winslow Homer.

Also using the area’s unique light quality, Riverhead’s Michael McLaughlin, a research analyst by trade, turned to photography when he found the East End and felt compelled to capture its natural beauty.

Sag Harbor’s Linda Capello, a figurative painter, will also show her work, which focuses on the body’s natural movement.

“What I am drawn to—what I draw—is the lyrical, sensual form; the body as icon of power and grace. I try to capture the body in that split second as movement stops—the turn of the head, flex of the arm, movement for the sake of movement, line for the sake of line,” Ms. Capello said.

A sculptor and mixed media artist out of East Quogue, Jonathan Pearlman transforms everyday objects into a new, imaginative form in his sculptures, with the goal that the viewer will discover the intrinsic beauty in the mundane.

Lucille Berril Paulsen of Water Mill will share her figurative paintings, which aim to create visual personality and capture “the attitude behind the face,” she said in a statement.

Here Comes the Sun will open on Friday, May 16 and run through Sunday, June 1. An artists’ reception is Friday, May 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Parrish Art Museum Curator Andrea Grover Wins Prestigious Exhibition Award

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The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

By Tessa Raebeck

In recognition of her innovation and experimentation, Andrea Grover, artist, writer and Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish Art Museum, was awarded a 2014 Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award to realize the upcoming exhibition, Radical Seafaring.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Scheduled to be on view at the Parrish from April through July 2016, Radical Seafaring was one of only three exhibitions to receive the prestigious biennial award, granted by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The award provides the museum with a $150,000 grant, as well as a living artist stipend for artists whose existing work will be included in the exhibition.

Established in 1998 to honor the artistic vision of Ms. Tremaine, an art collector, the Exhibition Award is intended “to give life to thematic exhibitions of contemporary art that are fresh and experimental in nature,” according to the Tremaine Foundation’s website.

Featuring about 25 artists, with works ranging from artist-made vessels to designs for alternative sea communities, Radical Seafaring will survey the practice of artist-initiated projects on the water “from its roots in conceptual and performance art of the 1960s and 70s, to an abundance of recent phenomenological research and site-specific works that involve relocating the studio, the laboratory, or the performance space to the water,” according to a press release.

A large part of the exhibition involves public programs, such as on- and off-site commissions, boat trips and artist-led excursions around East End waterways.

“The Museum Board of Trustees and I are extremely proud of Andrea for her highly original concept for the exhibition,” said Parrish Director Terrie Sultan. “Radical Seafaring is a perfect example of how the Parrish Art Museum’s programming responds to the natural setting and artistic life of Long Island’s East End in its commitment to illuminating the creative process.”

Since joining the Parrish’s curatorial team in 2011, Ms. Grover has been the recipient of various grants and fellowships. In addition to curating a variety of exploratory projects and programs, she initiates new models for temporary and off-site exhibitions through the museum’s Platform and Parrish Road Show series.

Water Mill Philanthropist Joan Hornig to be Honored at Ellis Island

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Joan Hornig of Water Mill will be honored for her philanthropic work at Ellis Island this weekend. 

By Tessa Raebeck

Joan Hornig, a philanthropist, art patron and jewelry designer from Water Mill, will be awarded by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations (NECO) with the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor May 10.

According to NECO Chairman Nasser J. Kazeminy, the honorees have the following traits: “The vision of a better world for all; the tenacity to overcome great adversity; the leadership and imagination to blaze their own trail. And most importantly, they have the humility and self-reflection to appreciate the amazing opportunities the America has given them. They inspire me; and we honor them so they can inspire others as well.”

Ms. Hornig is being recognized due to the philanthropic commitment of her jewelry line, which donates 100 percent of its profits from ales to the charity of the consumer’s choice through her Joan B. Hornig Foundation. The foundation has donated to more than 800 charities across the world, aiding causes that include the arts, animal rights, education, environmental protection, medical research and social services.

Parrish Art Museum Celebrates 40 Years of Jennifer Bartlett’s Work

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"Atlantic Ocean" Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

“Atlantic Ocean,” made in 1984 from 224 baked enamel steel plates, is on view at the Parrish Art Museum as part of its “Jennifer Bartlett: History of the Universe” exhibition. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

Using the images of house and home to convey not comfort but impermanence, subversion and abstraction, veteran artist Jennifer Bartlett has continually revisited the theme—and the contradictions therein—over her 40-plus year career.

In “Jennifer Bartlett: History of the Universe,” the Parrish Art Museum presents Ms. Bartlett’s work, from 1970 through 2011, in three galleries of massive enamel steel plates and colorful paintings, on view now through July 13.

“It explores the symbolism and themes that she works with over time, centering on the home and house and the relationships she has with her friends, motifs she explores routinely throughout her work,” Curatorial Assistant Michael Pintauro said of the exhibition.

Young artist Virginia Briggs draws inspiration from Jennifer Bartlett's work at the Parrish Art Museum Sunday, April 27. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

Young artist Virginia Briggs draws inspiration from Jennifer Bartlett’s work at the Parrish Art Museum Sunday, April 27. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

 

Originally from Long Beach, California, Ms. Bartlett emerged in the mid-1970s and quickly earned commercial success and critical acclaim for her work, which combines figurative and abstract art. The artist often melds together deep blues and greens in her paintings, delineated by harsh lines, panels and grids.

Jennifer Bartlett, "House: Lines, White, 1998." Enamel over silkscreen grid on baked enamel, steel plates. Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Jennifer Bartlett, “House: Lines, White, 1998.” Enamel over silkscreen grid on baked enamel, steel plates. Courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Ms. Bartlett first used the house image in “House Piece” in 1970, and the hearth has been a recurring theme in her work ever since.

“A house is basically a square and a triangle within a rectangle,” Ms. Bartlett observed in a conversation with Leisa Austin from the publication, “Jennifer Bartlett: Earth.” “It shows a human presence but it is totally abstract.”

In “237 Lafayette Street,” the title representative of Ms. Bartlett’s address in 1978 when the painting was completed, the traditional home image is distorted across three panels, representing the impermanence of a house. The geometric blocks remain the same, but the colors and designs surrounding it transform from muted to chaotic.

Ms. Bartlett’s friend Joan Didion, a writer and fellow Californian, said this notion of a chaotic “sense of place” stems from coming of age in the Golden State, where “children grow up aware that any extraordinary morning their house could slip its foundations in an earthquake, implode in a brushfire, [or] slide from existence on a suddenly unstable slope,” the author write in an introduction to “Jennifer Bartlett: Earth.”

Ms. Bartlett has been spending time at a cottage in Amagansett since the early 1990s, where, like many artists before her, she has enjoyed the natural inspiration of the many landscapes on the East End.

A massive piece on view at the Parrish, “Atlantic Ocean” is made of enamel laid over a silkscreen grid on 224 baked enamel steel plates. Completed in 1984, the work is obviously locally inspired, with off-white frothy waves melding into deep blue waters, a dune-lined island in the background.

Jennifer Bartlett, "Air: 24 Hours, Eleven P.M.," 1991–92. Oil on canvas. Courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Jennifer Bartlett,
“Air: 24 Hours, Eleven P.M.,” 1991–92.
Oil on canvas. Courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Also a multi-plate work, “Amagansett Diptych #1,” oil on two canvases made from 2007 to 2008, was just gifted to the Parrish’s permanent collection in April. Promised by Michael Forman and Jennifer Rice, it will add another Bartlett work to the permanent collection.

In both “Atlantic Ocean” and “Amagansett Diptych #1,” Ms. Bartlett used “graining brushes” resulting in an effect that Curator Klaus Ottman described as a “lush sensuality that still manages to meet her desire for grids and order.”

Made between 1991 and 1992, the series “Air: 24 Hours” has 24 paintings at 84 by 84 inches each, each representing an hour of Ms. Bartlett’s day. In “Eleven P.M.” on view at the Parrish, a cluster of handwritten notes and a pile of loose change converge sloppily on top of a desk in a scene evoking the stress of late night planning. Underneath the colors and haphazard scene is Ms. Bartlett’s familiar grid motif, constructing a sense of order after all.

Created in her Amagansett home in 2005 and 2006, “No One is Home” and “Something is Wrong,” paintings overwritten by the words in their titles, further demonstrate Ms. Bartlett’s distrust of the home as a place of undisturbed sanctity and refuge.

“Jennifer Bartlett: History of the Universe” is on view through July 13 at the Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org.

Jennifer Bartlett, "Amagansett Diptych #1," 2007-08 oil on 2 canvases. Courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Jennifer Bartlett, “Amagansett Diptych #1,” 2007-08 oil on 2 canvases. Courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Artists as Babysitters: Gabrielle Selz Unveils Memoir on New York City Art Scene of the Sixties

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By Tessa Raebeck

GabrielleSelzHeadshot

Gabrielle Selz.

Gabrielle Selz of Southampton will release her new memoir. “Unstill Life” at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill Friday.

The writer recounts her childhood growing up in the 60’s and 70’s in New York City, among art and artists during the peak of Abstract Expressionism. Ms. Selz’s father, Peter Selz, became the chief curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art shortly after her birth.

The family home was filled with artists like Mark Rothko and Willem De Kooning, and Ms. Selz recounts both the excitement and the ruin of the day.

Starting Friday, May 2 at 6 p.m., the evening includes a short film screening, a reading from “Unstill Life,” a book signing with Ms. Selz and a question and answer session with special guest Peter Selz.

For tickets and more information, visit parrishart.org/programs/662 or call 283-2118.

Lichtenstein Sculptures Settle In at Parrish

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Heller_Lichtenstein Sculpture Installation 4-17-14_5529_LR

By Stephen J. Kotz

Two security guards who usually patrol the galleries of the new Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill were pressed into service directing traffic at the museum’s entrance on Montauk Highway Thursday afternoon, as workers prepared a concrete slab for the placement of one of Roy Lichtenstein’s Tokyo Brushstroke sculptures while a small band of onlookers stood by.

It was a slow process, as could be expected, to move a pair of towering aluminum sculptures, the larger of which weighs more than six tons, the other two-and-a-half tons, into proper position, where, for the foreseeable future, they will be seen by the thousands of drivers who pass the museum every day.

“We are very pleased that we are able to offer the community a significant work by an artist of his stature,” said Terrie Sultan, the museum’s director, who braved the unseasonably cold weather to answer questions for those waiting for workers to finish drilling holes to place large anchor bolts deep in the concrete pads.

“They will be here for a long, long time,” she said of the sculptures, which are on an open-ended loan to the museum from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in cooperation with the collectors Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman and the Fuhrman Family Foundation.

Ms. Sultan said it was far too early to speculate if more sculptures by other artists will be added to the vast lawn in front of the museum, a barn-like building of poured concrete that was designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron. “We have only been here 18 months,” Ms. Sultan said. “The landscaping hasn’t even come in yet.”

She added that bringing in such sculptures is a costly and complicated process, never mind the fact that “scale is a major factor because the building is quite definitive in its presence.”

But Ms. Sultan said she was convinced the Lichtenstein sculptures, which are mostly painted in the primary colors of blue, red, and yellow, would become a “cultural beacon” that would help draw visitors to the museum’s new home.

The museum director called Mr. Lichtenstein “one of the most important American artists of the 20th century.”

“He was one of the major forbearers of the Pop Art movement,” she continued. “He was incredibly innovative in how he made art. He definitely changed the way we looked at the intersection of art and culture.”

Mr. Lichtenstein, who was born and raised in New York City, is best known for his comic-strip inspired paintings including “Whaam!,” which depicts an American jet fighter blowing up an enemy plane, and “Drowning Girl, in which a thought bubble above the subject’s head says, “I don’t care! I’d rather sink—than call Brad for help!”

He and his wife, Dorothy, who remains on the museum’s board, began coming to Southampton in the 1960s, moving there full-time in 1970 and beginning a long relationship with the Parrish. In 1982, the museum presented a show of many of the artist’s early works, and Ms. Lichtenstein was a major donor to the museum’s capital plan, according to Ms. Sultan.

Mr. Lichtenstein came to sculpture later in his career, according to Ms. Sultan, who said it was “a natural progression” for the artist to want to experiment in a three-dimensional medium.

Tokyo Brushstrokes I and II were created in 1994, just three years before Mr. Lichtenstein’s death in 1997 at the age of 83.

The pieces are part of a larger series of “Brushstrokes” that on display in cultural centers across the world, including Paris and Madrid, as well as the Hirschorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.

Ms. Sultan said that it is common practice for an artist to retain the rights to an artist’s proof of large-scale pieces like those from the Brushstroke series, which Mr. Lichtenstein did. In 2007, his estate exercised the right to execute the artist’s proof. The pieces were in storage in Rhode Island until they were installed last week, while the original remains on display in Tokyo.

“They really look great. They are just beautiful,” Ms. Sultan said of recently installed pieces on Monday. They offer a great contrast to the horizontal of the nature of the building.”

Southampton School District Voters Approve Parrish Art Museum Funding

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Voters in the Southampton School District on April 9 approved a proposition to help fund the Parrish Art Museum’s educational programs and exhibitions. The measure will provide $326,509 in funding—the same amount of money the museum has requested since 2009. The funding accounts for 7 percent of the museum’s annual operating budget.

A total of 178 votes were cast, with 101, or 57 percent of those made in favor of the funding, with 43 percent of voters opposing the proposition.

This is the first year the vote was held at the museum and the first year the proposition was separated from the annual Southampton School District budget vote, which takes place next month.

Following the examples of museums and libraries on the East End of Long Island and across the state, the Parrish chose to move the vote to the museum to enable voters to experience the institution firsthand, and to make clear the proposition is not connected to the school budget.

This is the 42nd year voters have approved requested funding for the museum.