Tag Archive | "Water Mill"

Multi-media Artist Jayoung Chung in Residence at the Watermill Center

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"Drawing YOU," 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing YOU,” 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

“Like the Moon, I am constant. My work, however, keeps changing like the moonshape which is changing all the time,” says Jayoung Chung, the newest artist in residence at the Watermill Center in Water Mill.

Starting her residency this week, Ms. Chung will be at the Watermill Center through April 6 working on her visual and performance art piece “Performing with You,” which incorporates drawing, music and technology into a performance. Primarily a visual artist, Ms. Chung is also a musician, animator, filmmaker and storyteller and most of her work is multi-media. A native of South Korea, she has exhibited her work in both solo and group shows worldwide.

In “Performing with You,” Ms. Chung has embedded 12 strings made of conductive wire, paint and tape within a sheet of paper. The artist creates a multi-dimensional portrait of an individual in the drawing performance. As she draws with charcoal, the instrument touches the stings, generating sounds in real time through a computer program. The act of drawing creates the sounds and the sounds in turn affect digitized, moving images projected on screens. The drawing, words and sounds all interact with one another to create a multi-dimensional portrait.

"Drawing, as composing and performance," 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing, as composing and performance,” 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

During her six weeks in residency at the Watermill Center, Ms. Chung hopes to create and record a series of 40 performance portraits.

“Above all, I want my art to be yours,” the artist explains in her bio, “I want it to be a sweet whisper, a consolation and happiness for you. I want your story to be revealed beautifully through my sensitivities, and approach you as nature’s wonder. For you.”

Southampton Students Show at Creative Partners Exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum

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By Tessa Raebeck

Featuring this year’s work from its longstanding collaboration with the Southampton and Tuckahoe Schools, the Parrish Art Museum will present the Creative Partners Exhibition, on view from Saturday, March 8 through April 14.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is “This Is Us,” a photo-documentary created by the Parrish Art Club, the Southampton High School’s after-school group, taught by Southampton art teacher Gail Altomare with help from Cara Conklin Wingfield, education director at the Parrish. Being shown in the gallery through video projection and also via an interactive website, the film is a digital portrait image-and-text exploration of the community at Southampton High School, including students, teachers and staff. Inspired by the Humans of New York project in New York City, the photo-documentary provides a candid view of the everyday lives of Southampton students through the unique, individual portraits they shaped of the people in their world.

The Creative Partners exhibition will also feature work by the schools’ pre-kindergarten, fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, including relief sculptures reflective of an art history curriculum focused on ancient Egypt and paintings inspired by the master landscapes of the museum’s permanent collection.

For more information, call 283-2118 x121 or visit parrishart.org.

Six-Hour, Multimedia Experience Challenges Conventions of Performance Art at the Watermill Center

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Kenneth Collins, Alaina Ferris and John Sully of the New York City-based performance group Temporary Distortion. Photo by Scott Fetterman.

Kenneth Collins, Alaina Ferris and John Sully of the New York City-based performance group Temporary Distortion. Photo by Scott Fetterman.

By Tessa Raebeck

The same performance could be enjoyed for 15 minutes or six hours—the only necessity is that the audience member has an autonomous, unique experience.

In “My Voice Has An Echo In It,” a new durational performance by the New York City based group Temporary Distortion, the traditional boundaries of performance and art are challenged in a six-hour, installation-based performance with live music, text and video. Temporary Distortion will present its latest work at The Watermill Center on Saturday from 2 to 8 p.m.

The performance comes at the end of the group’s two-week residency at the center, where its members have been developing the project, creating a site-specific installation and adjusting the ever-evolving final product.

Founded in 2002 by Kenneth Collins, Temporary Distortion has shown in venues across the world, including in Australia, the Czech Republic and Japan. According to the group, its  multimedia art “explores the potential tensions found between practices in visual art, theater, cinema and music.” Most recently, its focus has been on long, durational, installation-based performance with live music. Saturday will mark the first time the ensemble will consecutively perform all six hours of the material for “My Voice Has An Echo In It.”

Although the piece will run six hours in its entirety—and performers Alaina Ferris, Scott Fetterman, John Sully and Mr. Collins will perform throughout it—audience members are encouraged to come and go as they please.

“The audience can interface with it for however long they want to,” TJ Witham of The Watermill Center explained. “The audience is 100 percent in control, you can come and sit for the entire six hours if you want or you can experience it, go away and come back.”

The center is hosting a tour at 2 p.m., so that visitors can see the piece has started, take a tour of the building, grounds and art collection, and then reengage with the piece after their tour.

During its residency in Water Mill, the group has installed a corridor on-site in the center’s dining room space, alongside pieces from the art collection. While the performers are inside the enclosed box playing music and reciting text, accompanied by screens flashing text, images and video, the audience will use headphones to hear the material.

At the group’s New York City studio, it has installed a 24-by-6-foot hallway, which completely encloses the performers in a freestanding, soundproof box. Spectators watch the performance through two-way mirrors, so the audience can see inside the box, but the performer can only see his or her reflection. Following this weekend’s premiere, Temporary Distortion is bringing the show on tour through the United States and to France, using similar installations that interact with each building it visits.

“So what they’re presenting on Saturday is almost, in essence, like a dress rehearsal for them,” said Mr. Witham, adding the content of Saturday’s performance is yet undetermined, as the group is “creating it as they go along.”

Unlike traditional performances, the audience at “My Voice Has an Echo in It” is discouraged from trying to follow a progressive storyline or piece together some sort of plot; the intent is for people to engage, disengage and reengage, to create their own experience from what the group provides.

“The fact that an audience member could come at 2 p.m. and stay all the way to 8 p.m. and just listen to the music and hear the performance in the entirety and then someone else could come at 7:30 and be there until 8 and still have their own experience; that is a completely unique performative experience,” said Mr. Witham.

“It has the feeling,” he continued, “it’s connected with both performance and gallery installation, performance art installation—it’s extending the boundaries of what we consider performance and that’s obviously 100 percent at the core of what we do at Watermill and the kind of art what we want to support.”

The Watermill Center is committed to showcasing artists who are “doing what no one else is doing,” in the words of the center’s, Robert Wilson, and Mr. Witham said Temporary Distortion was an obvious choice for the residency program’s selection committee.

Dedicated to pushing the boundaries of theater and performance art, Watermill founder Mr. Wilson is known for his durational work. One of his earliest pieces, “The Life and Times of Joseph Stalin,” was 12 hours long.

“My Voice Has an Echo in It” will premiere Saturday, February 22, at the Watermill Center, 39 Water Mill Towd Road in Water Mill. The performance will run from 2 to 8 p.m. Reservations are free but required and can be made online here. For the 2 p.m. tour of the Watermill Center, reservations can be made here. For more information, visit The Watermill Center.

There’s Romance and Passion in Water Mill

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By Tessa Raebeck 

Red legs entwine on a stained surface, locked together in a sensual embrace. There are no faces or genitalia or obvious genders; those details are irrelevant, the figures blend together defined only by a clear purpose: love.

"Ex. 2 The Importance of Flesh" red industrial enamel paint on stained plywood by Melissa Mapes.

“Ex. 2 The Importance of Flesh” red industrial enamel paint on stained plywood by Melissa Mapes.

At the ninth annual “Love and Passion: Walk on the Wild Side” group show, opening this Saturday, February 15, in Water Mill, artist Melissa Mapes will feature her red legs paintings alongside the works of over 60 other artists in an adventurous celebration of music, art, love and the emotions that bind them together.

Originally organized by Karyn Mannix of karyn mannix contemporary and the late Vito Sisti, the show, traditionally held at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, is an open call “to get the community out,” Ms. Mannix said. This year, the show travels to Water Mill, where visitors will “walk on the wild side” between two galleries, Hampton Hang and the Sara Nightingale Gallery.

During the opening reception, host Sara Nightingale’s “Blind Date” Music Lab series will bring live music to a space between the two galleries. In the series, two musicians who have never met are brought together to perform, “though anyone who shows up with an instrument is welcome to play,” said Ms. Nightingale.

Held around Valentine’s Day each year, the show’s over arching theme has always been “Love and Passion.” Artists are  encouraged to use their own, subjective interpretations to create art that in turn elicits viewers’ own, subjective interpretations.

“Love and art have a lot in common,” explained Ms. Nightingale. “Both are elusive concepts designed by humans. We crave and need them both, yet neither is necessary for actual survival. Some art is very expressive and emotional, while other art is more intellectual, dry or subtle. Love has these disparate manifestations as well.”

“Additionally,” she added, “what one viewer experiences while looking at a work of art may differ completely [from] another viewer, who brings his own history and prejudices to his viewpoint. Fortunately, this is also true in love. For every lover scorned, there is somewhere another potential mate.”

Each year, a secondary theme further inspires the artists. This year’s “Walk on the Wild Side” is a double entendre honoring the late Lou Reed—who died last summer at his Springs home—and symbolizing the walk between the galleries, Ms. Mannix said.

“We are all in agreement on the tone being adventurous,” added Ms. Nightingale. “We want viewers to experience the thrill/trepidation they might feel on their way to a first date with someone they have been flirting with online.”

In “Grape Eater,” a nude female figure feeds herself grapes. As the viewer’s eyes move down the canvas, emotions can change with each color block: first a vibrant orange, then a royal blue and finally, a deep, rich red.

“I find art a constructive tool for most anything,” said the artist, Abby Abrams, a Springs resident who has two paintings of “fantasy nudes” in the show.

The show’s broad topic and open call format allows artists to submit works in various mediums and with diverse subject matter; the common theme serves to show the unity of the pieces—and the unifying power of love—while also representing the diversity of individual experience and interpretation. One artist in the show expresses a passion for surfing, while others use warm color palettes of red, pink and orange to show the evocative powers of love.

“Love and Passion is a beautiful theme because it resonates within us all,” said Ms. Mapes, whose paintings “Ex. 1: The Importance of Flesh” and “Ex. 2: The Importance of Flesh” are featured in the show.

An East Hampton native, Ms. Mapes began working on the series of “abstracted sensual flesh-morphing legs and buttocks forms” when her fiancé joined the military.

"Grape Eater" acrylic on canvas by Abby Abrams.

“Grape Eater” acrylic on canvas by Abby Abrams.

“We spent much time apart passionately longing for each other’s company,” she said. “It taught me how significant love and passion really is. We fought, and we still fight for our love, and we work for it all with a deep passion. It’s not easy, but it is worth every minute, as we both patiently pass the days waiting to feel that flesh-to-flesh contact once again.”

“Everybody can relate,” the artist continued. “Flesh is a primal necessity. To consume flesh, to feel flesh and to create flesh are crucial animalistic traits that are driven by a powerful energy force that feeds the will to survive for all animals.”

The figures in her paintings are cut off at the waist, allowing the intertwined legs and buttocks to “create a language of primitive symbols that express this dire necessity for flesh-to-flesh contact,” she said.

“I want the viewer to sense the emotion in the form and the line,” said Ms. Mapes. “I do not want a four-page essay neatly typed and placed next to the painting to ‘explain’ it. Art speaks for itself.”

“Love and Passion: Walk on the Wild Side” will be on view February 15 through February 22. The opening reception is Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Sara Nightingale Gallery and Hampton Hang Gallery, 688 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call 329.2811 or contact karynmannix@optonline.net.

Eclectic Music in a Cafe Setting at “The Lounge” at the Parrish Art Museum

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Singer/songwriter Sophia Bastian (photo by Helena Kubicka de Braganza).

Singer/songwriter Sophia Bastian (photo by Helena Kubicka de Braganza).

By Tessa Raebeck

From folk music to Brazilian-infused Jazz, the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will resonate with tunes this winter during The Lounge, its new eclectic music series presenting an unconventional line up of accomplished singers and musicians in an intimate café setting.

Rather than a traditional auditorium style concert, the Lounge invites the audience to be part of the performance and hear the music up close and personal. The audience is encourages to enjoy drinks at café tables, set up alongside the musicians.

“The cozy atmosphere allows audiences to experience music in a cordial, living room-like setting.” says Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish who organized the event with Museum Events Associate Amy Kirwin.

The series kicked off January 31 to a sold out performance by Edith and Bennett, a husband/wife folk and roots music duo.

On Valentine’s Day, the soulful singer/songwriter Sophia Bastian will perform at the Lounge. A New York native, Bastian recently opened for the Grammy-award winning band The Roots. Guitarist Ben Cassorla accompanies Bastian’s strong, sultry voice. Truly contemporary, her original music blends classic soul, jazz, blues and hip-hop.

The third and last act of the series will be the frequent Parrish performer, Richie Siegler All-Star Quartet, on March 14. The organizer of last summer’s highly popular Jazz en Plein Air series at the Parrish, Richie Siegler is the founding director of Escola de Samba BOOM and plays “jazz shot through with Brazilian beats” with his quartet.

The Lounge performances are at 6 p.m. in the Lichtenstein Theater at the Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. Tickets include museum admission and are free for members and students and $10 for the general public. Space is limited. For more information, call 631.283.2118 or visit parrishart.org.

Southampton School District Earns Safe Routes to School Funding

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. announced Friday that the New York State Department of Transportation (DOT) has agreed to amend the State Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) to include intersection improvements near Southampton Elementary and Intermediate schools. The proposed project will cost $498,374.

The project would be funded by the federal Safe Routes to School program. The intent of the Safe Routes to School program is to enable and encourage children to walk or bicycle to school; help children adopt a more healthy and active lifestyle by making bicycling and walking a safer and more appealing transportation alternative; and facilitate the planning, development and implementation of transportation project that will improve safety while reducing traffic, fuel consumption and air pollution in the vicinity of schools.

Brandenburg Executive Director of Choral Society of the Hamptons

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Brandenburg Photo

The Choral Society of the Hamptons has named David M. Brandenburg its executive director. He is a composer, co-founder of the Hamptons Shakespeare Festival, and music director of the Sag Harbor Community Band.

Mr. Brandenburg will help produce the Society’s June 29 performance of Handel’s dramatic oratorio “Israel in Egypt” Part II (Exodus) and Bach’s cantata 79, “Gott der Herr ist Sonn und Schild.”

The concert, a collaboration with the Greenwich Village Singers and the South Fork Chamber Orchestra, will take place in the Parish Hall of Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in East Hampton. It will be followed by a benefit dinner at The Palm restaurant with Mark Mangini, the Society’s music director and conductor, and soloists from the performance.

Interested singers can still arrange auditions by calling Brandenburg at 204-9402. More information is available at the society’s website, www.choralsocietyofthehamptons.org.

“David Brandenburg is an accomplished administrator who knows a wide variety of music and a respected member of the East End cultural community. His skills will contribute strongly to the progressively higher standards of performance we have achieved under Mr. Mangini,” said Daniel McKeever, the Choral Society’s president.

Brandenburg’s administrative experience began shortly after he graduated from Yale with a major in music and earned a master’s degree in music and music education from Columbia. He became program manager and director of information systems for Meet the Composer, a national organization based in New York City, and for 11 years was music director of the Yale Jazz Ensemble. In 1996, with the actor Josh Gladstone, he co-founded the Hamptons Shakespeare Festival, of which he remains the artistic director.

In addition to bringing productions to the South Fork, Brandenburg has contributed to the community as M.C. of the Teeny Awards, a high school theater recognition program of the East End Arts Council. For three years, he was a panelist for the “capacity building initiative” of the East End Arts Council and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Voters Approve $24 Million Beach Renourishment Plan for Sagaponack and Bridgehampton

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By Kathryn G. Menu

Oceanfront property owners in Sagaponack, Bridgehampton and Water Mill approved a referendum on Saturday night that will allow homeowners and the Town of Southampton to spend $24 million to replenish eroded beachfront. A beachfront only made worse by Hurricane Sandy’s impact this October.

According to Southampton Town Clerk Sundy Schermeyer, Town Attorney Tiffany Scarlato and Deputy Town Attorney Kathleen Murray between two erosion control districts in Bridgehampton and Sagaponack 75 ballots were cast in favor of the project and 49 against.

Only residents within the two erosion control districts were allowed to vote in the referendum.

According to Jennifer Garvey, with Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst’s office, 202 homeowners were eligible to cast votes in the referendum which will allow voters to pay for the beach renourishment through special taxing districts. One hundred and twenty four residents turned out to cast ballots in the referendum vote Saturday.

The project will encompass six miles of contiguous shoreline, including 141 properties, five of which are beaches owned by Southampton Town. The town will foot $1.5 million of the project to cover the cost of renourishment on its beaches.

“Today’s referendum marks the culmination of two and a half years of collaboration with our ocean front property owners — a group of constituents who first approached the town with an interest in forming a special taxing district in order to jointly pursue more efficient and cost-effective measures for protecting their properties,” said Throne-Holst.

The Southampton Town Board will serve as commissioners of both erosion control districts and will have to issue a $24 million bond to finance the project, which will be repaid by homeowners and the town over a 10-year period.

According to the town, properties within the two districts have an assessed value of $1.8 billion.

The project will entail dredging 2.5 million tons of sand from two areas one-mile offshore and replenishing the beach with that sand. It is expected to start in late spring or early summer, and will take about two months to complete.

“As individual property owners, many of us have been investing tens of thousands of dollars on an annual basis to rebuild our dunes and protect our homes from the impacts of erosion,” said Alan Stillman, a long-time Sagaponack property owner and member of the Sagaponack Beach Erosion Control District Advisory Board. “A systematic solution offers much greater protection and value. That is what we proposed — and have now approved.”

“From the start, we approached this undertaking like a business,” said Jeff Lignelli, a Bridgehampton property owner. “We researched numerous erosion protection measures and costs, and ultimately chose an award-winning coastal expert to design a renourishment project — the option we felt was the best fit for the area because it matches the look and feel of the existing beach, which was critically important to us. When the project is finished, the beaches will basically look like they did 30 years ago — much wider.”

The South Carolina-based firm of Coastal Science and Engineering led by Dr. Tim Kana designed the project.

First Coastal Corporation of Westhampton is the local permitting partner.

“Votes like this are always nerve wracking, but we are just thrilled the residents felt it was important enough to spend their own money on this,” said Aram Terchunian, with First Coastal Corporation, on Tuesday. “This is historic, particularly in the wake of what happened during Hurricane Sandy.”

Terchunian and Garvey said that now the project will move into the permitting phase, which was already pursued while awaiting the results of Saturday’s referendum.

Terchunian said both the New York State Office of Coastal Management and the New York State Office of General Services have already signed off on the project. It still needs approved from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Army Corp of Engineers.

While Terchunian praised homeowners for being willing to take on such a project, he added he believes the state and federal government will need to take a bigger role in beach renourishment in the future.

“These are levels of government getting huge benefits in the form of sales and incomes taxes in the regional and national economy tied to our beaches,” he said. “Beaches produce so much income on so many different levels we need to see they are protected.”

Whether or not this project will benefit from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funding for those impacted by Hurricane Sandy remains unclear. Beaches in both Bridgehampton and Sagaponack, having already contended with significant beach erosion, were hammered by the fall storm, whole stretches of beach literally washed away.

“We are pursuing that and the town is pursuing that very aggressively,” said Terchunian.

In fact, after Hurricane Sandy, the town board fast tracked this proposal after seeing the coastline and structural damage caused in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. The board voted unanimously to approve the proposal and a referendum on the project on November 27.

“I think this plan would have won the support it needed even before Superstorm Sandy, but what was initially a more proactive project became urgently needed following the storm,” said Throne-Holst. “Fortunately, these property owners were already well into the process of securing the needed support and permissions for their proposal, so it’s likely they’ll have a wide, protective beach within the year.”

“The beaches are a crucial part of our local economy and way of life, and the properties within these BECDs [Beach Erosion Control District] also comprise a major portion of our tax base. I think this is a remarkable public/private partnership that will greatly benefit both the property owners and all of our town residents, and I’m proud to have been a part of making it happen,” she said.

Update: Kidd Regrets “Disruption” Water Mill Accident May Have Caused; Thanks Friends and Family for Support

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Kidd Photo

 

 

Through his Twitter page, this week NBA guard Jason Kidd, who was recently signed to New York’s own Knicks franchise, said he regretted any disruption his Water Mill car accident has caused and thanked his family and friends for their support.

“I regret any disruption my accident last weekend may have caused members of the community and want to thank the local authorities,” wrote Kidd late this week on his Twitter account. “I’d also like to thank my family and friends for their support.”

Kidd, 39, was arrested by Southampton Town Police for a misdemeanor charge of Driving While Intoxicated by Alcohol (DWI) just 10 days after signing a contract with the famed basketball franchise.

Kidd was charged in the early morning hours of Sunday, July 15. Later that morning, Kidd pled not guilty to the charges in Southampton Town Justice Court.

According to Southampton Town Police, around 1:56 a.m. on July 15 they received a 911 call reporting a motor vehicle accident at Cobb and Little Cobb Road in Water Mill.

“We were there within five minutes,” said Southampton Town Police Chief William Wilson during a press conference on Monday.

According to Wilson, a preliminary investigation revealed that Kidd was driving southwest on Cobb Road and proceeded through an intersection before hitting a telephone poll, snapping it at its base before his 2010 Cadillac Escalade came to a stop in a wooded area.

Kidd, of Dallas, Texas, was the sole occupant of the vehicle, said Wilson at Monday’s press conference. He was brought to Southampton Hospital for “minor injuries,” said Wilson and released into police custody before his appearance at Southampton Town Justice Court later that morning.

According to the arrest report, police said Kidd “smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage,” and also slurred his speech, was unsteady on his feet and had “bloodshot, watery and glassy eyes.”

“I want to clear up any rumors or misconceptions,” said Wilson on Mondays, noting the case has drawn significant media attention because of Kidd’s status with the NBA. “He was cooperative during the arrest process.”

The 2011 NBA Champion played for the Dallas Mavricks from 2007 through 2011 before signing a three-year contract with the New York Knicks just two weeks ago.

Police Continue Search for Hit & Run Driver

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This week, Southampton Town Police urged a 30-year-old Latino believed to have been the driver of a car that hit and killed Roman Catholic Sister Jacqueline Walsh in Water Mill last week to come forward and turn himself into police.

According to Southampton Town Police Chief William Wilson, the man — whose name police are withholding at this time — is purposefully evading police at this point.

“We are not going to stop until this suspect is taken into custody,” said Wilson during a Monday morning press conference on a different matter. “We are working with the county, the state and U.S. Marshalls. I am putting every investigative resource into this case.”

Wilson said the department, working with other agencies, has followed up on a number of tips from community members about the location of the man in question, but that he appears to be moving around, evading arrest so far.

Wilson declined to say when the department would release the name or a photograph of the suspect, but added he would do so when his investigative team believes that is the best course of action.

Police have described the individual as a “white, Hispanic male,” about 5’7” with short spiked hair. Police believe he was wearing dark shorts and a white shirt at the time of the incident.

Sister Walsh, 59, of Syosset was struck and killed during the hit-and-run accident on Rose Hill Road in Water Mill on Monday, July 9 around 8:30 p.m. Sister Walsh was on a religious retreat at the Sisters of Mercy house and was taking a walk when she was hit by a 2009 Volkswagen Touareg.

Police responded to the scene after receiving reports of a woman lying on the roadway, “bleeding and unresponsive.”

According to police, it appears the driver of the vehicle was an employee of the car’s owner — Rose Hill Road resident Andrew Zaro. The SUV was abandoned on a street nearby the scene of the hit and run.

Sister Walsh was a pastoral associate of St. Edward the Confessor Church in Syosset. Over the weekend, she was laid to rest at Holy Rood Cemetery in Westbury, reportedly drawing hundreds to the burial on Saturday, thousands attending her wake on Friday night.

On Monday, Chief Wilson was adamant that justice would be served on behalf of Sister “Jackie,” as she was affectionately known by family and friends.

“We have investigators working very hard on this,” he said. “We will make every attempt we can to take this suspect into custody.”

In addition to the Southampton Town Police Department, the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office, the state police and the U.S. Marshals are aiding in the investigation. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Southampton Town Police Department’s Detective’s Unit at 702-2230.